Word of the Week: Umbrage

Umbrage is a noun and defined as a feeling of anger caused by being offended. The word umbrage is borrowed from the Middle English word ombrage, which is derived from the Latin word umbrāticus (in the shade), from umbra (shadow, shade). The word umbrella has similar roots to umbrage and is also derived from the Latin word umbra (shadow, shade).

Originally used in the 15th century, umbrage was a common word used in poems and plays, although the definition of umbrage has taken on new meaning. In William Drummond’s “Poems”, published in 1616, Drummond used the word umbrage to describe a shade or shadow. While in Shakespeare’s play Hamlet, Shakespeare uses umbrage when describing a shadowy suggestion of something. The word’s meaning further evolved to take on the definition of a feeling of anger caused by being offended.

Synonyms 
Resentment, huff

Sentence 
Macy took umbrage at the professor’s remarks, because she did not agree with them. 

Main Source 
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/umbrage

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: